The Pixel 5a 5G may have the same chip as last year’s Pixel 4a 5G

We’re heading into the middle of the year, which means it shouldn’t be long before we see new Pixel smartphones. But things seem a little more turbulent this year, not only because of the strong COVID-19 pandemic, but also because of a new problem affecting all sorts of electronic devices: a global shortage of chips. Although the effects of this deficiency were felt mainly on PC components, such as graphics cards, it began to affect smartphones. However, plans are still in place for Google to launch the regular Pixel 2021 line, which will include the Pixel 5a 5G. But if you expect to see major changes, be prepared to be disappointed: it looks like it will still have the same SoC as the Pixel 5 and Pixel 4a 5G, Snapdragon 765G.

The phone was previously expected to be almost identical to the Pixel 4a 5G and Pixel 5 in terms of external design and according to the suggestions discovered by 9to5Google in Android 12 Developer Preview 3, it could have the same SoC. The Snapdragon 765G was and is an excellent chip, but a successor, the Snapdragon 780G, is already in town. So why would Google throw the 765G on the Pixel 5a 5G if it’s the same SoC that powers its predecessor? If I had to speculate, probably because of the constant lack of chips, as I mentioned earlier. So far, we haven’t felt its effects on the availability of smartphones, but phone manufacturers are struggling to get their hands on new chips, and that probably includes Google.

Given that the Pixel 4a 5G and Pixel 5 are already powered by the Snapdragon 765G, Google probably already has a fairly large amount of chips, and their use for the Pixel 5a 5G makes sense. We’ve seen similar moves in the past, such as LG (RIP) launching the LG G6 with Snapdragon 821 because they failed to secure enough Snapdragon 835 chipsets in time to launch the phone.

The lack of chips has made the death of rumors about future Google smartphones darker than usual, but we’re still excited to see what they have available by the end of this year.

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